Bio:
Tara Lohan has been writing about energy, water and the environment for more than a decade. She is currently the managing editor of Water Deeply. Her work has been published by the Nation, the American Prospect, Salon, AlterNet, Earth Island Journal, BillMoyers.com, Grist, New America Media, YES! Magazine, KQED, UPI and others. She is the editor of two books on the global water crisis and tweets from @TaraLohan. 

More About Tara:

Sixteen years ago, I slept beside a river in the Green Mountains. The next morning I woke up and began writing about water. I have followed its meandering course ever since. It took me through an undergraduate degree at Middlebury College in environmental studies and nonfiction writing, and then a graduate degree in narrative nonfiction from the University of Oregon's School of Journalism. It's also a journey that led me to the Capitol, the desert Southwest, the soggy Northwest, and finally to settle atop a hill in San Francisco in 2006.  

From that perch I joined AlterNet, a leading online news magazine, as a managing (and then senior) editor. Over the course of seven years at AlterNet I wrote about the intersections of water, energy, and food, composing more than 250 stories read by more than 8 million people. My work has been published by the Nation, the American Prospect, Salon, AlterNet, Earth Island Journal, BillMoyers.com, Grist, New America Media, YES! Magazine, and others. In that time I edited two books on the global water crisis. They have beautiful photographs, essays from some of my favorite writers like Barbara Kingsolver and Bill McKibben, and are only sort of horribly depressing (you can find the most recent one, Water Matters, here). 

In the summer of 2013, along with my partner, I launched Hitting Home, a multimedia journalistic project to document how communities (human and nonhuman) are being impacted by more and more extreme methods of fossil fuel extraction. For three months, pulling a Cricket trailer and accompanied by our dog Buffalo Bill Cody, we toured the U.S. visiting coal mines, silica sand mines, tar sand mines, gaslands, pipeline paths, oil fields, and those living beside it all. 

In 2014 in a project for Grist and CEL Climate Lab I teamed up with photographer Sarah Craig and data journalist Anna Flagg to launch Faces of Fracking, a multimedia project profiling those on the front lines of oil and gas development in California.

Currently, I work as the managing editor for Water Deeply, part of News Deeply, where I report on the California drought and water issues in the American West.